Network slicing is great but can existing OSS/BSS support it?

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Network slicing allows operators to segment their network and configure each different slice to the specific needs of that customer (or group of customers). So rather than the network infrastructure being configured for the best compromise that suits all use-cases, instead each slice can be configured optimally for each use-case. That’s an exciting concept.

The big potential roadblock however, falls almost entirely on our OSS/BSS. If our operational tools require significant manual intervention on just one network now, then what chance do operators have of efficiently looking after many networks (i.e. all the slices).

This article describes the level of operational efficiency / automation required to make network slicing cost effective. It clearly shows that we’ll have to deliver massive sophistication in our OSS/BSS to handle automation, not to mention the huge number of variants we’d have to cope with across all the slices. If that’s the case, network slicing isn’t going to be viable any time soon.

But something just dawned on me. I was assuming that the onus for managing each slice would fall on the network operator. What if we take the approach that telcos use with security on network pipes instead? That is, the telco shifts the onus of security onto their customer (in most cases). They provide a dumb pipe and ask the customer to manage their own security mechanisms (e.g. firewalls) on the end.

In the case of network slicing, operators just provide “dumb slices.” The operator assumes responsibility for providing the network resource pool (VNFs – Virtual Network Functions) and the automation of slice management including fulfilment (i.e. adds, modifies, deletes, holds, etc) and assurance. But the customers take responsibility for actually managing their network (slice) with their own OSS/BSS (which they probably already have a suite of anyway).

This approach doesn’t seem to require the same level of sophistication. The main impacts I see (and I’m probably overlooking plenty of others) are:

  1. There’s a new class of OSS/BSS required by the operators, that of automated slice management;
  2. The customers already have their own OSS/BSS, but they currently tend to focus on monitoring, ticketing, escalations, etc. Their new customer OSS/BSS would need to take more responsibility for provisioning, including traffic engineering;
  3. And I’d expect that to support customer-driven provisioning, the operators would probably need to provide ways for customers to programmatically interface with the network resources that make up their slice. That is, operators would need to offer network APIs or NaaS to their customers externally, not just for internal purposes;
  4. Determining the optimal slice model. For example, does the carrier offer:
    • A small number of slice types (eg video, IoT low latency, IoT low chat, etc), where each slice caters for a category of customers, but with many slice instances (one for each customer)
    • A small number of slice instances, where all customers in that category share the single slice
    • Customised slices for premium customers
    • A mix of the above.

In the meantime, changes could be made as they have in the past, via customer portals, etc. Thoughts?

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